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How to make bone broth for healthy – and delicious – soups and stews

The best way to show respect for a harvested animal is to use every part.
470 400 Survival Common Sense Blog | Emergency Preparedness

Ever wonder what secret ingredient was in your grandmother’s chicken soup that made it so tasty? And why did that soup seem to cure coughs, runny noses, sniffles and cold-related maladies? Well, the broth may have had something to do with that.

by Leon Pantenburg

The best way to show respect for a harvested animal, IMO, is to use every part. That includes putting to use the hide, horns and antlers, sinew, organs and miscellaneous trimmings. Every big game animal has parts that are discarded, often because people don’t know what to do with them. (I have two perpetually-hungry black Labs, so not much gets wasted after a successful harvest.)

The best way to show respect for a harvested animal is to use every part.

The best way to show respect for a harvested animal is to use every part.

But except for dog food,  the bones are often ignored.  An often forgotten use is to make broth from these.

Bone broth can have incredible nutritional value, and it adds a taste to gravies, sauces, aspics, soups and stews you can’t get with anything else.

To make bone broth, you basically boil and simmer the bones in water for several hours. This causes the nutrients to leach out. These nutrients include minerals from the bones but also the nutrients that are contained in the meat, skin, bone marrow, cartilage and tendons that attach to bones.

I ran across an article about the value of bone broth and some recipes on the Azure Standard website. You might find it interesting, too. Check out  bone broth.

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